The Cloud Needs IT

The Cloud Needs ITYour photos, contacts and email are in the cloud, but could your next job be in the cloud, too? Perhaps you’re in data management or you know a thing or two about file storage. You could be fresh out of college, have hands-on experience or simply want to work your way from the bottom up. No matter how you look at it, the growth in the cloud industry means the demand for IT professionals like yourself will remain a constant.

Ever-expanding Growth

Over the last three years, dozens of organizations have participated in the 2013 Future of Cloud Computing Survey, sponsored by North Bridge Venture Partners. As you’d expect, this year’s results were the largest yet. Almost 900 people responded, with about a third of those being CEOs of tech companies. The results show that 75 percent of companies plan to use some sort of cloud technology in their operations this year, up from 67 percent in 2012, proving the momentum isn’t slowing down.

Much more than just Data Storage

The cloud offers many options to businesses, both small and large, as well as IT professionals, but what are they using the cloud for? The survey says the most important cloud applications are file sharing, productivity, collaboration, customer relationship management (CRM) and marketing. Professionals also believe cloud technology’s growth will soon encompass mobile information, data backup, security and helpdesk apps, among others.

Furthermore, flexibility is one of the main reasons businesses find a cloud storage server appealing. Cloud computing makes recovering data during times of a disaster easier than ever, and companies realize this. CEOs want agile and scalable solutions, while affordable pricing encourages the cloud’s adoption.

The ability to communicate with employees, partners and clients inside the office and out is all some companies need before hopping on the cloud computing bandwagon. However, not everyone has the opportunity to do so. In rural areas of the United States, not everyone has the bandwidth necessary to work with the cloud, so local storage is a better option. Although improving and adding to broadband infrastructure isn’t directly related to the cloud, jobs in those industries will remain secure until everyone has a connection fast enough to connect.

Security Getting Stronger

In the past, opponents pointed out that security in the cloud was lacking. This was especially true for small business owners, but these fears are decreasing as security improves. IT jobs will certainly continue to rise as cloud providers do their best to close those security holes and convince businesses that their cloud block storage is safe.

The relative youth of cloud computing also means that some business owners and IT pros are less sure about the different management options, which some respondents label as complex. However, this provides room for growth and, as a result, more job openings.

No matter your specialty or whether you prefer to work on the hardware or software end of things, working with the cloud is a smart move. Because of the benefits it offers, cloud computing will be embraced by businesses of all sizes and consequently the IT industry will see changes occur while remaining a vital and necessary resource.